Common WiFi Problems and Their Solutions

Common WiFi Problems and Their Solutions

While using WiFi you are bound to encounter certain connectivity and speed issues which are common to almost all WiFi users. While they may be annoying and difficult to troubleshoot at times, they can best be resolved by certain DIY tips and tricks.

WiFi OmniDirectional Antenna

Here are 4 most commonly encountered problems and their solutions:

1. Unable to connect to router.

This is one problem that has endless possibilities of causes and solutions. However there are certain drills that can systematically troubleshoot this issue. First of all make sure that your router is configured for DHCP or Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. If you find it already compatible with it, disable it and enable it again. If that does not ease out your woes, try to disable wireless security and try to connect. Disabling security works at times because of mismatched Wired Equivalent Privacy key which drops the IP address. Besides these measures, check for electrical interference that may be caused by some devices such as baby monitors, alarm systems and microwave ovens.

2. Connection is too slow

If you find your connection to be too slow, there are a couple of things you need to check. There is a possibility that you have added electronic equipment to your surroundings recently that works on 2.5 GHz frequency and is overwhelming the WiFi signals. If you identify any such item, turn it off and observe if there is an improvement. Next thing that you need to pay attention to is the number of WiFi networks in your vicinity. If your neighbours also have a WiFi network running on 2.5 GHz chances are that both of you are on the same channel since 2.5 GHz has only three free channels and the rest are overlapping channels. One way to deal with such a problem is to modify the channels that your router uses. You can do this by accessing the device’s setup controls and changing them manually.

3. You lost your passphrase and are locked out

This definitely spells trouble but not for long. If you have lost your passphrase and hence cannot access your router controls, there is no need to panic because it is possible to reset the device to factory settings. You can do this by pressing the reset button that is provided by many router manufacturers at the back of the case. It is usually recessed into the case and requires a little poking by a pin or any other thin object such as a paper clip. On keeping the button pressed for 3-5 seconds, you can reset your router. While the upside of such an activity is that you can again access your router, the downside is that you will lose any modifications that you had done to the router and will need to redo them.

4. Dead Spots

Another common problem that you may encounter is presence of dead spots in your house where your 802.11g router cannot reach. The solution to this issue is to switch to an 802.11n router and adapter. 802.11n routers can help because they use a technology called MIMO or “Multiple In Multiple Out” which enables broadcast and reception of multiple signals. What essentially happens at a dead spot is that the data stream that has reached the router has already been bounced off too many times by walls, floors and furniture and hence it makes little or no sense to a legacy 802.11g or 802.11b router. A MIMO enabled router combines all bounced reflections to make maximum sense out of them and cures the dropouts to give good speeds at such barren places.  Another option is to upgrade your antenna and reposition it by connecting an RP-SMA extension cable between the router and antenna.

 

 

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